New Research Article: Removing Privet has added benefit of removing exotic earthworms

Thanks to Mincy Moffett for sharing this reasearch.  This study investigated the possibility of a facilitative relationship between Chinese privet (Ligustrumsinense) and exotic earthworms in the southeast US. Earthworms and selected soil properties were sampled five years after experimental removal of privet from flood plain forests of the Georgia Piedmont region. 

More Not so Good News: Wolf Spiders like living in Microstegium, and they eat alot of amphibians

Thank you to Mincy Moffett for passing this along. Microstegium vimineum (Japanese Stilt Grass) is a plant almost all of us have a tough time dealing with.  A new study published in Ecology has found that Microstegium also affects arachnid predators as wolf spiders thrive in the grass. As their populations grow, more spiders then feed on young American toads, ultimately reducing the amphibian’s…

NY Times Article discussess Conflicts of Novel and Traditional Conservation Strategies

This article has been making the rounds lately, but for those that haven’t had a chance to read it. In anticipation of Climate Change, some have been proposing new approaches in conservation such as moving species to new ranges, actively managing wilderness areas, and using non-natives  as surrogates for extinct species.  However, others prefer to focus on protecting wilderness and classical restoration that keeps ecosystems…

Feature Article: Vegetation of Isolated Montane Non-alluvial Wetlands of the Suthern Blue Ridge of North Carolina

This is an interesting thesis written by Brenda Wichmann. 2009 (Wichmann) Vegetation of geographically isolated montane non-alluvial wetlands of the southern Blue Ridge of North Carolina Abstract – The ecological significance of montane non-alluvial wetlands in the southern Blue Ridge region of North Carolina is well known. However, there is relatively little quantitative documentation of…

New Article Offers New Information for Battling Reed Canarygrass

Reed Canarygrass is a coarse, cool season perennial grass that grows 2 – 6′ high.  It has become a major threat to in ecological integrity of our native wetlands as it forms large, monotypic stands and outcompetes most native plants. Invasion often occurs in concert with disturbances, such as ditch excavation and stream modification. This paper describes a reed canarygrass removal…